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Title Jamaica Militia shoulder belt plate, other ranks
Nationality British Empire
Period c 1803
Price £450.00

This is an other ranks shoulder belt plate of the Regency era. The Jamaica Militia of 1662 was the immediate successor to Oliver Cromwell's troops which had taken Jamaica from the Spaniards seven years earlier. In 1694, the French landed a force of over 1,400 men and were repulsed by some 250 militiamen.

After the French attack, the various cavalry and infantry regiments of the Jamaica Militia remained on call. Those early part-time soldiers therefore spent most of their time in uniform in an internal security role, which largely meant dealing with slave disturbances. Later, with justified fear of Napoleonic incursions, the Militia reached its maximum strength at the beginning of the 19th century, with 10,000 infantry and 1,000 cavalry divided between three regiments of horse, one for each county, and 18 regiments of foot, one for each of the then 18 parishes of Jamaica. (The above information was found online at The British & Commonwealth Military Badge Forum.)

It is constructed of pink tinted bronze/brass with a dark green patina on the reverse and a smooth polished finish to the front. The crocodile symbol of Jamaica (from the full coat of arms) is used as a central motif. Its condition is excellent for its age.

If you want to comment on this item—re quality, age, etc—please email me.


[Militaria : Badges : British Empire : 19th Century]

testimonials

Just a quick line to advise that the badges have arrived in good condition and I am very pleased with them.

Thanks again for your prompt and kind attention.

P M, Australia, 03.10.2012

I received the cockade today and am very pleased!

D B, UK, 27.12.2010

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